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Zabladowski
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Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
05. Oct 2004 at 23:53
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Although I thought I was on top of all the major film festivals, the Festival du nouveau cinema, unspooling in Montreal from October 14-24, has escaped my notice up 'til now.
Since we have a correspondent up that way, I'm hoping to tempt him into taking in a few screenings and reporting on them for us.  Grin

Here are some of the highlights!?! All film descriptions lifted from the festival's website.

Childstar
Taylor Brandon Burns is a 12-year-old American boy who also happens to be the world's biggest TV star. He comes to Toronto to shoot a film, but disappears from the set - and his troubles. His driver, a failed filmmaker, has to go off in search of the missing star. Childstar is the second feature by Canadian indie-film icon Don McKellar. At once a bitingly satirical comedy and a serious family drama, the film skewers the Hollywood North scene with perfectly targeted black comedy. Beneath the caustic surface is a heartfelt reflection on family, however dysfunctional it may be. The motley assortment of characters gels into a delightful ensemble: the egotistical mother, given to histrionics (Jennifer Jason Leigh); the amiable but absent father (Eric Stoltz); the manic producer (Dave Foley); the lovable loser (McKellar); and the endlessly indulged child (Mark Rendall). In portraying their strange ties, the film communicates real emotion with humour and brio.
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Temporada De Patos  (Duck Season)
Flama and Mako are planning to spend a quiet Sunday playing their favourite video game, in which they try to take down Bush or Bin Laden. Flama's mom is away visiting her sister, but the neighbour shows up to bake a cake. At 16, she's just a couple of years older than the boys. When a strange pizza-delivery boy shows up, the afternoon veers off in a totally unexpected direction. This film, one of the most original seen at Critics' Week at Cannes this year, is the first feature from young Mexican filmmaker Fernando Eimbcke; he steers his four characters into daring and delectable absurdity. With its crisp black and white cinematography, non-professional actors, and nearly out-of-control madness, Duck Season floats on a light tone tempered with seriousness. The director elegantly shows us that major crises can sometimes wait for another day...but that a crazy day like this one unfolds in the shadow of the future.
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Boats Out Of Watermelon Rinds
In a Turkish village in the 1960s, two solitary teens decide to build themselves a movie projector, a first step on the way to fulfilling the dream of making films. But while they love cinema, one of them also loves the girl next door. This semi-autobiographical story is the first film by young Turkish director Ahmet Uluçay. It's one thing to make a film about adolescents languishing in a remote one-horse town...and another to succeed in making us believe every frame and empathise fully with the characters. Using a digital camera, Uluçay demonstrates his expansive imagination and a rare mastery of his craft. An impressive first effort that earned him the award for best Turkish film at the International Istanbul Film Festival. A fresh and innocent piece, featuring extraordinarily accomplished art direction.
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Mirage
"Hope is the worst of evils, for it prolongs the torments of man." This thought from Nietzsche opens this film that follows a young Macedonian boy, Marko, as he suffers physical and emotional brutality at home and at school. Totally friendless, Marko escapes into writing. Encouraged by his teacher, he soon realizes that this lone hope can also be shattered, a development that produces profound pain and kicks off a disturbing series of events. Mirage is the first feature from Macedonian director Svetozar Ristovski, whose film is a parable on Macedonia and, more broadly, on the turbulence and suffering that have afflicted the Balkans in recent years. Throughout, we share in the alternating hope and despair experienced by young Marko. This honest portrayal of difficult circumstances is driven by the exceptional performance of Marko Kovacevic, who gives the film its power and authenticity. A profoundly sensitive work.
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Acapulco gold
A film loosely based on the true story of an encounter between actors Julie and Michel Maillot and Elvis Presley - in Acapulco, in 1991, fourteen years after the King's supposed death. Reality is often incredible, and too few movies portray it as such. Not so the films of André Forcier, one of Quebec's most fascinating filmmakers (L'eau chaude, l'eau frette, Le Vent du Wyoming, La Comtesse de Bâton Rouge). His creativity is as uninhibited and flamboyant as ever in this comedy without gags that knows nothing of boundaries between dreams and reality, truth and lies, Longueuil and Acapulco. Blending autobiography, documentary, and pure fantasy, Acapulco Gold is a captivating film that boldly questions the notion of reality. Featuring a hero suffering from narcolepsy (the magnificently motormouthed Michel Maillot as Bob Garrigues), a son called Proutt who is supposedly a Presley, the King's Mexican revelations, and an American producer in a panic over SARS. The only thing to do is abandon yourself to this sublime madness.
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Demi-Tarif
Three children: two brothers and a sister. They survive without a father, and their mother is mostly absent. They do what they want, steal food, get sick to skip school, and hang out in movie theatres to while away their sleepless nights. Sometimes they cry, often they laugh. This is the second film by young actress Isild le Besco who, at 22, has already appeared in over 20 pictures, including major roles in Sade and Roberto Succo. Critically acclaimed and much talked-about at festivals, it's like a fairy tale without fairies - a rare film devoid of an adult perspective. Shot in a few days with a digital camera and starring three unknown children (one of them is the director's younger brother), Demi-tarif is a precisely realized piece in which no tangent is left to chance. Its assured and gentle direction marks it as the work of a true artist. One admirer, filmmaker Chris Marker, hails "the emergence of a new New Wave for which Demi-tarif is the À bout de souffle."
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Also on the schedule are



« Last Edit: 20. Mar 2005 at 19:03 by Zabladowski »  
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josephk
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #1 - 06. Oct 2004 at 00:25
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Thanks for the notice, Zab.

However, I'm way ahead of you on this one!  Grin Didn't I tell you about this festival last month? Those are some good suggestions and I was already planning to see most of these when I had a quick look at the program this weekend. I had somehow managed to miss "Mirage" though, so I'm glad you posted that one.

I really don't think words can express how excited I am about this festival. I almost went nuts when I saw the program. There are so many great movies playing that I had been reading about for the past few months, some of which I didn't think I would get a chance to see so soon, maybe even ever.

Most of the movies I'm really excited about are off topic, and you've pretty much covered all the on-topic ones I know of in this thread. I will try to catch as many of them as my schedule and financial situation allow, and I'll be sure to post some reviews here.

So far, the only ones I am 100% sure I will see on that list are Childstar and Bad Education. I will kill to get tickets if I have to. I'd say Demi-Tarif and The Heart is Deceitful Above All Things are next on my list of priorities, although they all look like they've got something good to offer. It's just that there are many other films I want to see more, even if they don't feature boy actors. (I know, it sounds crazy.)

I've been meaning to post these pictures of Kolia Litscher, from Demi-Tarif for a few days. I guess here is as good a place as any. Also included is the poster for the film. These are all from the official website.

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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #2 - 06. Oct 2004 at 00:29
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Thanks Zab,

'Mirage' and 'Demi-Tarif' look to be the most promising of that lot.

With all due respect to Mark Rendell's acting skills, I'm unimpressed that he is playing a 12 year old in 'Child Star'. Mark was born in 1988, so that would make him 16 this year. Hopefully the movie was actually filmed two or three years ago.
  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #3 - 06. Oct 2004 at 00:33
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With all due respect to Mark Rendell's acting skills, I'm unimpressed that he is playing a 12 year old in 'Child Star'. Mark was born in 1988, so that would make him 16 this year. Hopefully the movie was actually filmed two or three years ago.


Yeah, I know. That pisses me off too. I want to see the movie for entirely different reasons, actually. Doesn't have much to do with the fact that there's a boy in it. (Among other things, I'm hoping for a chance to meet Don McKellar, to be honest.)

It's possible that the synopsis is wrong. I find that's often the case. Sometimes, the boy's age is not even mentioned in the film and it's just some stupid reviewer who decides to call him a "12-year-old", then other pick up on it, even if the character was never meant to be that age.
  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #4 - 06. Oct 2004 at 00:42
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It's possible that the synopsis is wrong. I find that's often the case. Sometimes, the boy's age is not even mentioned in the film and it's just some stupid reviewer who decides to call him a "12-year-old", then other pick up on it, even if the character was never meant to be that age.


That's a very good point.

Have a great time seeing the movies you are interested in.

PS.  I'm curious about the O/T movies that you are keen on seeing.
  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #5 - 06. Oct 2004 at 00:52
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PS. I'm curious about the O/T movies that you are keen on seeing.


Oh, I have a list of about 30 that look interesting. Some of the ones I am most excited about include (directors in brackets):

Innocence (Lucile Hadzihalilovic)
Tropical Malady (Apichatpong Weerasethakul)
10 on Ten (Abbas Kiarostami)
Clean (Olivier Assayas)
Notre musique (Jean-Luc Godard)
Palindrome (Todd Solondz)

As well as new films by François Ozon, Michael Winterbottom, Catherine Breillat, Agnes Varda, Claire Denis, Emir Kusturica, Wim Wenders, Spike Lee, Mike Leigh and Raoul Ruiz.

And, Mondovino, a documentary about wine trade.

These are all either movies I've read about or directors whose work I'm intersted in. Considering that there were about four movies in total at the World Film Festival (out of something like 400) that I had even heard of before, I'd say there's really something to get excited about here. Smiley
  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #6 - 06. Oct 2004 at 22:54
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If you did tell me about this joseph, I must've forgot (early stage alzheimer's?), but I'm glad you're on top of it. With a few notable exceptions the films here look more commercial (read that more likely to one day get a video release) than those at the WFF.

Like cal, Mirage is the film that would be on the top of my list, but you've got me awfully interested in Kolia Litscher now.  Smiley

FWIW, Clean might be marginally on topic and I want to see Palindromes as well.  Smiley
I've also yet to be disappointed with any of Mark Rendall's work, so I'll hold my tongue until I see his new film.

I look forward to your report from the festival.
  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #7 - 10. Oct 2004 at 01:17
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just to let you all know, I've got tickets to screenings of:

Childstar
La mala educacion
Turtles Can Fly
The Heart is Deceitful Above All Things
Demi-tarif
Boats Out of Watermelon Rinds
Mirage

And a bunch of other movies that don't feature boys.

Duck Season and Acapulco Gold unfortunately didn't fit into my schedule.
  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #8 - 22. Oct 2004 at 08:46
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The festival is almost over. Just one more weekend.

Films of interest that I've seen so far:

Clean
Childstar
Turtles Can Fly
The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things
Temporada de Patos
Demi-tarif
The Tulse Luper Suitcases (Peter Greenaway's seven-hour epic in three parts)

I'm going to wait until after the festival is over to give you my comments on these films. I will see at least one more that is of interst here: Mirage.

I am very disappointed that I missed Almodovar's Bad Education. He's my favourite director and I've been looking forward to this movie for over a year. I actually got to the screening late and couldn't get in because of it. However, I just found out that it will be playing (at the same theatre) in January, so it's not too depressing. I just have to wait a bit longer than expected.

I've seen lots of other good movies. I'll tell you about them next time.
  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #9 - 25. Oct 2004 at 10:29
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The festival ended yesterday.

Here's my complete list of films, from best to worst, based on my overall enjoyment of the films. Movies in red featured at least one boy.

1. The Tulse Luper Suitcases, parts 1, 2 and 3 10/10
2. Mondovino 10/10
3. Adieu 8/10
4. Comme une image 8/10
5. Duck Season 8/10
6. Innocence 7/10
7. Notre musique 7/10
8. Mirage 7/10
9. Tropical Malady 7/10
10. Childstar 7/10
11. Une place parmi les vivants 7/10
12. Clean 7/10
13. A Letter to True 7/10
14. 10 on Ten 7/10
15. Cinévardaphoto 7/10
16. Palindromes 6/10
17. Demi-tarif 6/10
18. Claude Sautet ou la magie invisible 6/10
19. Public Lightings 6/10
20. 9 Songs 5/10
21. The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things 5/10
22. Turtles Can Fly 5/10
23. Star Spangled to Death 2/10
24. Anatomie de l’enfer 1/10

I will only comment on the ones that feature boys, but if you have any questions about the others, just ask and I'd be happy to tell you more.

1. The Tulse Luper Suitcases, parts 1, 2 and 3 10/10

This is Peter Greenaway's insanely ambitious project. The total feature film, shown in three parts on three separate evenings, is about seven hours long. The boy character only has a significant role in the first episode of the first part, so you should know this before you decide to invest so much time into such a large project.

The boy with the most screen-time, then, plays the young Tulse Luper in the episode that deals with his childhood. He continues to appear from time to time throughout the film, but only briefly. There are a few other boys who show up once in a while, most notably in Part II.

I don't really know how to describe this movie. If you're a fan of Peter Greenaway, then you probably know what to expect and you would probably enjoy this. Otherwise, you will probably be very confused. Greenaway pushes the multi-layering that has defined his style throughout his career to new extremes here. I thought it was brilliant, but many, many people will hate it.

I haven't been able to find the names of the actors yet, but I'll post more info if I can figure it out.

5. Duck Season 8/10

This is essentially a Mexican rip off of Jim Jarmusch's style, but the movie is very well done and tells an original story, so I didn't mind. Shot in black and white with many other characteristics of Jarmusch's style (a camera that almost never moves, precise use of music, frequent fades to black to separate scenes, quirky dialogue, understated performances, etc.)

The story is about two adolescents (13 and 14) who plan to spend Sunday alone playing video games. But the girl from next door comes to use the oven to bake a cake, and the pizza delivery guy refuses to leave until they pay him. The four characters hang out and get to know each other.

*mild spoiler ahead*

I noticed in a very early scene that one of the boys was paying a lot of attention to his friend as he was getting dressed, after taking a shower. I suspected there might be more than friendship between them. Later in the film, the boy who was doing the looking ends up kissing the girl. He then brags about it to his friend, but when he asks how it made him feel he says he doesn't know. Later, he confesses to the girl that he sometimes has fantasies about his friend. For example, they play a game at the arcade and when they win they jump around and his friend takes him in his arms. Very mild fantasies, I admit. But significant.

Finally there is a scene where he dares to try a few moves on the other boy, who doesn't offer much of a response. At the end of the film, his friend has decided that he will move with his father, who lives in a different city. The other boy says: "So there won't be any more Sundays?"

I really liked the way the subtle "love story" between the friends was presented. In the end, not much has happened between them, but at the same time you feel that this last Sunday together is going to have a huge impact on their lives (for different reasons). In fact, it will probably have a huge impact on all four characters. But the one that moved me the most was the boy who quietly comes to realize that the friendship will never be what he wishes it would be (because his feelings are unreciprocated), and in fact is likely to come to an end when his friend moves away.

*end spoilers*

8. Mirage 7/10

In terms of pure "boy movie", this is my favourite from the festival. It's very, very hard, so don't expect a happy ending. But it's very moving and the boy (who is the lead character and who appears in every scene) is appealing in every way - in terms of his looks, acting ability and character.

The film tells the story of a boy who is going through hard times and receiving help from no one. His father is an alcoholic. His mother is a non-responsive victim. His older sister is an abusive bitch. And the bullies at school make his life a living hell. The boy has a talent for writing, and his teacher starts to take an interest in him because of it. He wants him to write a patriotic poem for an upcoming contest, saying his writing might be his ticket out of this place to a better life.

At first, it seems like a typical story about how a teacher helps a kid to find his place in the world by nurturing a particular talent (in this case writing, but it could have been music, sport, or even dancing). However, the film refuses to go the easy way and insists on showing you a reality that is much harsher.

*major spoilers ahead*

(I am going to pretty much describe the entire plot until the more-or-less shocking ending. Don't read if you don't want to know what happens.)

At one point, the boy is beaten by the bullies and the professor runs away rather than come to his rescue. This is the moment when everything starts to fall apart and the boy realizes that this man who has promised to help him, and who should therefore protect him, is much weaker than he at first imagined. From our perspective, he may just be another flawed human being, but from the boy's perspective this constitutes a major betrayal and marks the beginning of both their downfall.

The boy meets a criminal who lives in an abandoned train wagon and who teaches him that the way to survive in this world is to "eat them before they eat you". He tells him if he wants something he has to get it himself, even if it means stealing. He tells him that others are abusing him because he fears them and once he stops fearing them they will be afraid of him.

It doesn't quite work that easily, though, as the bullies in school are getting more and more violent and they don't seem to have any reason to fear him. The biggest bully who leads the gang is actually the son of the chief of police (who catches our main character selling stolen perfume) and pretty much gets his way by shoving his dad's gun in other people's faces.

Then things start to get really bad. The criminal teaches our young protagonist how to use a gun. He promises to take him away with him, but leaves without telling him. Meanwhile, the professor at school continues to let him down. Witnessing the change in his favourite pupil's character, he turns his back on him instead of reaching out to him.

You know this is all leading to something terrible, and when the boy gets his hand on the bully's gun, he's reached the point of no return. Now, for the first time, he's not afraid of them and they are afraid of him. He goes home and when his father starts yelling at him, he pulls the gun out on him. But he's not going to wast his only bullet on him. He returns to the school on the day of the celebration of independence, where a girl has taken his place and is reading the poem he should have written and read. The teacher sees him, takes him aside to ask if he's OK. "I'm sorry", the boy says. "Oh, it's nothing" the reacher replies, thinking he's apologizing about the poem he never wrote. But the boy continues: "I'm sorry you didn't help me." And shoots him in the chest.

It's very rare that this type of movie dares to go this far in bringing the conflict to its logical resolution. I've seen a lot of movies where I felt that something like this was going to happen in the end, but the filmmakers usually chicken out near the end and turn things around for a pseudo-happy ending that is completely unsatisfying. This one may be brutal, but it is very effective.

*end spoilers*

10. Childstar 7/10

Mark Rendall was probably around 15 when this was filmed and he does indeed play a 12-year-old character. This is annoying, of course, but not as bad as it could have been. For one thing, he is a very talented actor. For another, he plays a character that is more mature than his age (in some ways), so he does look and act older than he is. And finally, he looks slightly younger than he is.... although I'm not quite convinced he would pass for 12. You can judge for yourself when you see the film.

But putting that aside, I think it's a very good movie and one that is definitely worth seeing, especially since it deals with the subject that we are all fascinated with here: boy actors.

Don McKellar (the director) made a film that intelligently mixes humour and drama. I don't really have much more to say on the topic, actually.

12. Clean 7/10

Maggie Cheung won the prize for best actress at Cannes for her performance in this film. Nick Nolte is also great in it. It's about a former rock musician who tries to cope with the death of her boyfriend, for which she is blamed by the media and his family, while trying to kick off her addiction to heroin and find a job, in order to regain custody of her son.

The son lives with his grandparents in Vancouver. He's very cute and there are a few scenes with him throughout the film, especially at the end. The focus is definitely on the mother, however.

16. Palindromes 6/10

Todd Solondz continues to make films about awkward teenagers and to shock everyone in the process by tackling some sensitive issue with characteristically black humour. In this case, he deals with teen pregnancy and abortion. The focus is on teenage girls, but there is one sequence with a boy. Unfortunately, I didn't catch the actor's name and IMDb doesn't have the full cast listed yet. I'll post more info when I have it.

17. Demi-tarif 6/10

An unusual film, only 65 minutes long and completely improvised. We follow three siblings around (two sisters and one brother) as they try to survive without parents. There is a bit of voice-over narration to give us clues as to what is going on. Most of the dialogue is so insignificant that the translators didn't bother subtitling it.

The boy is appealing, but there's not much in terms of a story. An interesting experiment.

21. The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things 5/10

If you're intersted in seeing two hours of extreme child abuse, then this movie is for you. That's pretty much all it is.

On the positive side, the boys playing the main character are very cute and very talented. I prefered the first part, with the younger Jimmy Bennett, but fans of the Sprouse brothers won't be disappointed with their performance.

22. Turtles Can Fly 5/10

People loved this. They even gave it the Public prize. I was not impressed. Apparently, filming a baby crying and holding a barb-wire fence for three minutes is considered an original and powerful way of showing the horrors of war. Apparently, also, people have never heard of a thing called life magazine.

This is in competition for the foreign-language Oscar. I wouldn't be surprised if it was nominated or even if it won. Machuca is also in competition and I think it deserves much more recognition than this. We'll see what happens.
  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #10 - 28. Oct 2004 at 00:54
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Thanks for writing up all of your thoughts joseph, it made for great reading.

With the exception of Turtles Can Fly (which I thought was exceptional), I have yet to see any of these films so I'm pleased to get more information on them.

I have the opportunity to see Anatomy of Hell this weekend, I take it you recommend that I not.  Grin

  
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Re: Festival du nouveau cinema 2004
Reply #11 - 28. Oct 2004 at 08:26
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I have the opportunity to see Anatomy of Hell this weekend, I take it you recommend that I not.


Well, it depends. If you want to spend an hour and a half looking at an extreme close up of a woman's vulva, while a gay man looks at it and explains how disturbed he is by it, because it reminds him of a baby bird he killed when he was a boy, then you might like it. You get lots of "shocking" images (like when they pull a bloody tampon from the woman's vagina and then drink the blood from it) and lots of stupid comments like: "The woman's body inspires disgust", "All men want to kill women and that's why they sleep with them", etc.

The message of the movie seems to be that (a) the female anatomy is disgusting, (b) all men hate women, because they find them so repulsive, (c) gay men are only slightly less guilty than straight men - they in fact harbour the same feelings against women, but they just don't know it - and they are in fact more disturbed (d) and finally if a gay man stares at a naked woman long enough, in spite of his disgust, he will be overcome with the urge to have sex with her, essentially curing himself of his homosexuality.

Sounds like fun, right?

If you ever feel masochistic enough to actually go see it, you will be rewarded with two brief flashbacks. The first features the gay man as a boy, when he kills the bird that looks like a vagina. The second features the woman, when a group of boys get her to take off her clothes and let them look at her vagina. Both flashbacks are very brief, and the boys are not on screen long enough to make the rest of the movie worth suffering through.
  
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